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Alabama Rot - What you Need to Know

3 CommentsWednesday, 14 March 2018  | 

We first blogged about Alabama Rot a few years ago. Sadly it is still a risk and fresh outbreaks are still being reported, so it is important to continue to keep spreading the message to dog owners. Alabama Rot is a serious and potentially fatal disease that all dog owners should be aware of.

One of the first recorded cases of Alabama Rot in the UK was in December 2015 when two cocker spaniels contracted Alabama Rot after a walk in the woods. Despite many reported cases and ongoing research, the cause of the disease is still unknown.

Alabama Rot skin lesions on dogs

What is Alabama Rot?

Cutaneous and Renal Glomerular Vasculopathy (CRGV or ‘Alabama Rot’) causes lesions on the skin and occasionally in the mouth, which can look like bites, sores, wounds or stings. Some dogs go on to develop life-threatening kidney failure.

Any age, sex or breed of dog can be affected. CRGV has not been seen in animals other than dogs. Owners of affected dogs have not been seen to be affected by this illness.

Symptoms

Alabama Rot symptoms in dogs

- Skin lesions, ulcers or sores
- Lethargy and general lack of energy
- Not wanting to eat
- Vomiting

Preventative measures

A number of possible preventative measures have been identified.

Dogs Trust advises:

- When walking your dog stay on dry paths. Avoid wet or muddy areas.
- Wash any mud off your dog after walks and dry them thoroughly.
- Check your dog regularly for lesions or wounds, especially ones that don't seem to heal.
- Visit your vet if your dog seems unwell, is lethargic, vomiting or refusing food.

Help save lives - please spread this message.


Christine Meaney
Friday, 23 March 2018  |  14:44

Thank you for the information provided regarding Alabama Rott


Fmogofas
Friday, 23 March 2018  |  21:08

And there’s me thinking Alabama Rot was a fungal infection contracted by neglected horses left out in all weathers.


Bianca Barr
Monday, 9 April 2018  |  14:03

Had no idea that it is prevalent in the UK. Keep our doggies on dry land and out of swamps and mud!

D for Dog
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